Season Review Positive (Watch This) Deon Cole: Cole Hearted - Summary, Review (with Spoilers)

Deon Cole: Cole Hearted – Summary, Review (with Spoilers)

Deon Cole’s Cole Hearted is the first special, in a long time, that is not only funny but quotable as hell.

Community Rating

5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)


Director(s) Ryan Polito
Screenplay By Deon Cole
Date Released 10/8/2019
Genre(s) Stand Up Comedy
Where To Buy, Rent, or Stream? Netflix
Noted Cast
Himself Deon Cole

Plot Summary/ Review

Deon Cole, known for being one of Conan O’Brien’s writers, Black-ish, ­and spin-off Grown-ish comes out of nowhere with a comedy special for the ages. One which knows how to tap that line between funny and offensive, but not cross over to the point people talk more about 5 minutes of his hour set than anything else. For with him presenting comedy in the form of talking about his gay cousin, without going in on the gay community, getting older, talking about honesty, and the suicide rate, he mostly skirts controversy.

Now, granted, what he says about big girls, some may find it offensive or fetishizing. However, it depends on how you feel about the things he says. But, as a whole, take it from someone who doesn’t laugh a whole lot, this s*** was hilarious.

Collected Quote(s) or .Gifs

“When white people find s***, they call Lost and Found. When Black people find s***, they call it ‘A Blessing.’”
— Deon Cole

You don’t even acknowledge how unique you are. What you do is, you get dressed and go in the world and be like everybody else, and that ain’t success. Success is supply and demand. Givin’ people somethin’ they ain’t never had before and applyin’ yourself to whatever you do. That’s what makes you unfireable, goddamn it. They can’t do what you do. You get what I’m sayin’?
— Deon Cole

You married on a level you should have been passin’ in life.
— Deon Cole

Don’t you understand, everybody don’t deserve to be around you? They don’t. Usin’ you for your moxie and your aura, your charisma, your security, your education. They don’t need that.
— Deon Cole

You gonna let you “I ain’t” years run into your “you cain’t” years.
— Deon Cole

Highlights

Skirting That Line

After Dave Chappelle’s most recent special, there was a call for comedians realizing that their place in society is to make fun of those in power, not the little guy. Cole doesn’t do that, but rather, like Mo Gilligan in his special, he presents himself as someone who may travel more than the average person, but isn’t out of touch. He knows 90s R&B is better than modern R&B. Also, he relates to the idea that certain foods can only be eaten on certain sides of your mouth, or there will be a problem.

However, he does go into territory that could get him trouble. In some cases, it is just dipping his toe. Like talking about what a deaf church would be like, some of his interactions with his gay cousin Leslie, and how to interact with someone he sees as a masculine woman. But what may get him in hot water is how he talks about big girls.

Why? Well, generally, the way he talks about women is in a sexual sense, but when he talks about big girls you may feel he is going a bit hard on them. Be it questioning if big girls get kidnapped, jokes surrounding their sleep apnea, them having deeper voices, or sexualizing them in a way that some may see as them being fetishized. Add in he focuses most of the tail end of the special on how sex with big girls is like, and calling out people who don’t admit to having sex with big girls, you may feel like that’s the blemish of a rather good special.

It’s Quotable

Deon explaining what SLAP means.
Deon Cole: I’m like, “What the hell was that?” He like, “Sounds Like A Plan [SLAP].”

One thing that most specials don’t feel like anymore is quotable. Rewatchable as well, but just having something that makes them feel like they have longevity is increasingly rare. Especially considering, with the streaming wars, and Netflix flooding the market, it isn’t like a special gets to be the only one out for a good few weeks, or months, before another comedian gets the spotlight.

Which makes Cole bringing up his cousin’s “Slap” acronym, the “Welp” moments, among other things, the type of stuff that makes you wonder how slept on is Deon Cole? I mean, assuming his IMDB is up to date, this appears to be only the second comedy special he has had! Can you believe that?

Inspirational Moments

Another thing a lot of comedians don’t really do as much is get real with you for a minute. Cole does this in the form of his suicide and honesty segment. One that is primarily aimed towards women, but isn’t preachy. Well, it is at times when talking about wigs, weaves, and makeup, but he jumps off the road to misogyny and does touch on empowerment.

Mostly in the form of not dealing with people who aren’t on your level. Embracing your age and what’s unique about you, and showing that as much as he can be sexual and vulgar as the next comedian, that isn’t all he has to offer.

Overall: Positive (Watch This)Recommended

Deon Cole before the lights come up on his special.

This is the type of special that reminds you of the old days when people had to work their way up to having HBO, or another major network, approach them. When specials were a showing that you made it. Not something done because a network needed content, but that you have paid your dues, honed your act, and you truly are one of the greats and deserve not just a platform to showcase it, but a pedestal for your peers, and those who aspire to get into the business, they have something to look up to or compare themselves with.

That is what Deon Cole: Cole Hearted delivers. So definitely check it out, only on Netflix.

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Overall Community Rating

5
5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)
Recommended100%
Positive0%
On The Fence0%
Divisive0%
Skip0%


Review Summary

Skirting That Line
85 %
It’s Quotable
95 %
Inspirational Moments
84 %
Amari Allahhttps://wherever-i-look.com
I started Wherever I Look back in 2011 and from movies, TV, the occasional book, play, and Broadway show, have been trying to bridge the gap between a critic and an avid lover of various forms of media.

Community Rating

5
5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)
Recommended100%
Positive0%
On The Fence0%
Divisive0%
Skip0%

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