B – The Beginning: Season 1/ Episode 3 – Recap/ Review (with Spoilers)

Koku and the unknown woman before they face off.

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B – The Beginning, might have begun to lose its luster as neither the villains or heroes are presenting reasons to invest in their stories, or the show.


Network
Netflix
Director(s) Kazuto Nakazawa

Yoshiki Yamakawa

Writer(s) Katsuya Ishida
Air Date 3/2/2018
Characters Introduced
Kamui Kazuya Nakai

Played For Fools: Keith, Kamui, Minatsuki, Koku, Kaele

Kamui letting his superior know things are going according to plan.Taking note of the events in episode 1, Keith realizes that, in the long run, the gas released upon the people within the hotel wasn’t toxic. But it isn’t just a hunch. Kaele was battling it out with Kamui’s hacker until Kamui decided to begin his art project. Which included sawing the man’s head off and meticulously cutting off his skin. On top of that, from the way it looks, Minatsuki sped up time just to give his people ample time to get out of there.

And, of course, considering Koku’s chase with the unnamed woman, it pushes the idea that one major crime was made to cover up another. The question is though, for us as an audience, what was the purpose of all of this? Was it all simply to draw Koku out of hiding?

Commentary

When you see our heroes played in such a manner, yet still get minor victories, it really pushes you to wonder if this is to build up the villains, or plant some kind of underdog opinion of our heroes? For while it was nice to see Kaele slowly, but surely, get the upper hand, she was the only one who came out of this situation looking good. As for Lily and the rest, recognizing Market Makers are terrorist and these are just basic cops, who seemingly have a ridiculous budget, that only Kaele takes advantage of, it puts them on the defense.

Thus giving us an almost DBZ kind of flavor where the heroes take embarrassing defeats, at first, just to have some sort of phoenix moment setup for later. Which, honestly, I am kind of feeling bleh about since it comes off a bit too obvious.

The Real Boss: Minatsuki, Kamui

Minatsuki implying that while he maybe the face of the Market Makers we know, someone else ultimately pulls the strings.After the shenanigans of the hotel are handled for an escape, Minatsuki reconvenes with Kamui and the unnamed members of his party. Of which seemingly didn’t do as they were asked. If not, at least made the type of progress their current employer wanted. For, you see, it seems there is a communication issue within Minatsuki’s ranks. He is dealing with psychopaths who likely love the money he can get them, but are still legitimately crazy people. So, when he gives an order, they interpret it and come up with an agenda all their own. Which tries whatever patience Minatsuki has.

Commentary

So it is established that, at least in terms of being a main point of contact, Minatsuki is the leader. However, who is it employing them is now the big question. That alongside how much do you have to pay the Market Makers and what does their employer want Koku for? Much less, they keep noting how they need him alive, but with this weird twist of making it sound like he can barely be alive and that would also work just fine. So are they just looking to take something of his, that they need blood circulation for to be viable? Be it his wings or blade? For with the woman he fights talking about “Touch Canopus,” it pushes this idea there is definitely some sort of market for doing some kind of procedure on Koku and taking things from him.

Nothing Hurts More than Being Forgotten: Koku

From what it appears, at least with whoever Koku is fighting, there is history. Perhaps with all the members of Minatsuki’s group there is, but a history rooted in a shared childhood connects Koku with the unnamed woman. Yet, seemingly due to suppressing his own memories, Koku doesn’t remember her at all. Leading to the woman to imply it is because of something Koku did that he wanted to suppress in his mind. As for what that is, like the woman’s name, we are left without an answer.

Commentary

The woman Koku was facing noting she refuses to be forgotten by him.While I appreciate the chase scene and the hints to an idea there is more than meets the eye when it comes to the relationship between the Market Makers and Koku, there is something frustrating about this. I get shows need to keep your attention and string you along but then comes into play this is a Netflix show. In my mind, you cannot have a show premiere on Netflix and not be made for binge watching. It can’t be written to be watched weekly with the mindset of there being a gap for their audience to get over the parts they hate about the show.

Because, seriously, with the way villains are being knocked off, the way Koku and the police are being handled, and this weird lack of urgency, this show is losing me. Alongside that, I don’t even know if it is worth investing in Minatsuki’s group for they either die not too long after being introduced or the most interesting about them is their appearances.

Like, what am I supposed to be grasping onto here to keep me going for 9 more episodes? Because the origins of Koku surely are not acting as the hook I think they’re intended to be.

Question(s) Left Unanswered

  1. What is with the foot pedals Kaele was using?

Collected Quote(s) & .Gifs

“The answer won’t be found on the surface. It’s always behind the scenes.”

Highlights

  1. Kaele, low-key, seems like a bad ass and doesn’t have this generic persona about her.

Low Points

  1. No genuine reason, yet, to invest in any character.

On The Fence

  1. Koku’s past and his connection to members outside of the woman he fought could be of interest – if handled right.

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About Amari Sali 2900 Articles
New Jersey native Amari Sali takes the approach of more so being a media advisor than a critic to sort of fill in the gap left between casual fans of media and those who review productions for a living. Thus being open about bias while still giving enough insight, often with spoilers, to present whether something is worth seeing, buying, renting, streaming, or checking out at all.