Title Card - Taylor Tomlinson Have It All
"Title Card," Taylor Tomlinson: Have It All, directed by Kristian Mercado, 2024, (Netflix)

With recently hitting 30, Taylor Tomlinson is past her quarter-life crisis, but even with great career success, she clues us into whether her personal life could catch up so she can have it all.


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Director(s)

Kristian Mercado

Written By

Taylor Tomlison

Date Released (Netflix)

February 13, 2024

Genre(s)

Stand Up Comedy

Film Length

1 Hour 6 Minutes

Content Rating

Rated TV-MA

Noted Characters

Self

Taylor Tomlinson

Plot Summary

With no longer being in her 20s, Taylor Tomlinson finds herself facing hard truths. Dating? Well, it may always be trash. Anxiety and panic attacks? Like back pain, you can take drugs for it; just be careful about the dosage. As for life in general? Honestly, while there was a time when Tomlinson was religious, it doesn’t seem like God is giving a sign anytime soon that anything but her career might get better.

Content Information

  • Dialog: Cursing
  • Violence: N/A
  • Sexual Content: Sexual Situations (Implied – Dialog)
  • Miscellaneous: N/A

Review

On The Fence

It’s Therapy Comedy Featuring Updated Versions Of Tomlinson’s Past Jokes

One of the things we love about Taylor Tomlinson is that she gives you relatable comedy. She makes it clear that getting older isn’t fun, being single sucks, and she does this all while being in her own lane as a comic. There aren’t stories about getting blacked out drunk because, like most, she doesn’t find that normal or safe. Note: She doesn’t judge, but she does worry.

Taylor talking about how she handled things in a past relationship
“Taylor talking about how she handled things in a past relationship,” Taylor Tomlinson: Have It All, directed by Kristian Mercado, 2024, (Netflix)

But, while Tomlinson is relatable, unfortunately, sometimes the humor matches “Help me” energy and even feels like she doesn’t have new things to say. For example, some of her crowd work is just hearing from the audience ways that can help her get to sleep because Xanax, amongst the other generic ways, aren’t cutting it.

Also, if you’re the type who likes to escape when it comes to your entertainment, she doesn’t offer that to you. This is therapy she gets paid for, so she can pay her therapist. So, yeah, it is cool to hear someone else finds dating to be hard, especially if you’re introverted, but when each topic boils down to, “My life would suck if I didn’t have a successful career,” it feels like less of a shtick and more a cleverly designed way to vent with an audience (though that might be comedy in general).

Now, don’t get me wrong, does she have comical moments? Yes. However, this comedy special is definitely more of a “Glad I waited for this to be on Netflix” than wishing you bought tickets, likely pushing $100 to see this early.

Recommendations

Good If You Like

Taylor noting her career is going well
“Taylor noting her career is going well,” Taylor Tomlinson: Have It All, directed by Kristian Mercado, 2024, (Netflix)
  • Jokes about being a young adult and doing well career-wise but not doing the best in your personal life
  • Mental health jokes
  • Humor regarding the single life vs. that in a relationship

If You Liked This, We Recommend:

  1. Hasan Minhaj: Off With His Head
  2. I Love You So Much I Could Die

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Taylor Tomlinson: Have It All

Summary

Our Rating: Mixed (If Affordable) Do you remember how they used to say that streaming devalued music? A part of me wonders, between comedians having social media, every platform wanting a comedy special, and then getting so much material for free, if maybe the same can be said for comedy? Don’t get us wrong, “Taylor Tomlinson: Have It All” has its moments, but if we compared comedy specials to albums, and if every album is supposed to represent the closing of a chapter or era, it feels like Tomlinson might be a better comedian but doesn’t have much new to say. Ultimately, this makes “Taylor Tomlinson: Have It All” feel like something good enough to submit to Netflix for a check rather than be the type of comedy special that, on its own, truly feels special.

Overall
77%
77%
  • It's Therapy Comedy Featuring Updated Versions Of Tomlinson's Past Jokes - 77%
    77%

Highlight(s)

Disputable

  • It’s Therapy Comedy Featuring Updated Versions Of Tomlinson’s Past Jokes

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