Furious Thoughts Live (2017) – Summary/ Review (with Spoilers)

Kidy Fury dancing.
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Being this was my first stand up show, I wasn’t sure what to expect. Now, granted, I’ve been listening to “The Read” for years and am still subscribed to Kid Fury’s Youtube channel. Even if he hasn’t added a video in a year… But there is a difference between what you know has the potential to be edited and something live. Especially since, for some reason, “The Read” isn’t at that Breakfast Club level where they record them talking and their expressions.

Yet, knowing Kid Fury is hilarious and he emotes in such a way you can imagine his expressions, I decided to haul my behind to NYC to check this out. I wasn’t, what so ever, disappointed.

Venue John L. Tishman Auditorium at The New School
Venue Address New York, NY
Director(s) N/A
Writer(s) Kid Fury
Date 5/20/2017
Genre(s) Stand Up Comedy
Good If You Like Urban Culture

Gay Culture

Pop Culture

Total Time 1 Hour and 15 Minutes
Noted Performers
Headliner Kid Fury
Opening Act Asante

Summary

The Opening Act(s)

Asante

Depending on how you look at it, Asante could be considered an opening act. For while it didn’t necessarily seem he had a set and he was probably only on stage 3-5 minutes, he did crack a joke or two. One noting he was going to be on Love & Hip Hop NY, as a joke, and him just playing up the crowd’s response to that and him.

However, there was this vibe, because of how long it took to get into the venue, much less them playing with the lights, that he was more so there to keep people from asking questions. Because, while $40 something dollars isn’t much for a live performance, [note]For reference, I believe Lizzo tickets were $15 and The Pretty Reckless were about $25 – $40, with a digital copy of their album. Plays haven been usually $50 – $89 and Kinky Boots was a good $120 or so[/note] it still is enough for Black folk, who dominated the audience, to want some answers and entertainment. So between him and Dustin, who was in the audience, followed by Crissle who came in late, someone was going to have to show themselves.

The Headliner

Kid Fury

Coming out in a romphim, and the most balling pair of sneakers I have ever seen, Kid Fury was warmed up and ready. He began with talking about Future, the rapper, and his concerns for him, switched up into one of his favorite shows Iyanla Fix My Life and then jumped into Trump. But, unlike many a comedian (?) you see on a comedy special, this is live and interactive. So, being that the New School theater [note]Which does not have the best seats, at least in my theater, if you are wide. Comfortable to sit in, nice back support, but those separators ain’t made for big people[/note]wasn’t blinding him and he could see his audience, there was some interaction. Especially as he saw many audience members with liquor bottles just chilling. Like, he knew his audience, how to pick with them, but never necessarily insult them. His audience he treated just as he would Crissle, Asante, or Dustin. He’ll side eye and question you, but it didn’t seem to me like he was attacking anyone.

Moving right along, while the above-covered half of his little over an hour set, the rest was about his Furious Thoughts. Of which dealt with McDonald’s commercials, Drake, deodorant, and Flat tummy tea. Which, I know, in writing, may not sound that interesting, but believe me when I saw you will be laughing, or at the very least smiling, as Kid Fury breaks it down [note]as he would say[/note] for you girls.

Collected Quote(s)

Some things ain’t shaming but a shame.

Highlights

Audience Interaction

Holding a bottle an audience member was drinking from.

I know that for comedy clubs there often is interactions with the audience, but usually, it is touted as something negative, a la Michael Richards and assumingly response to heckling. So to see this dude interact with his audience in a very cordial way was something. Be it the liquor bottle thing, talking about kink shaming because he doesn’t want someone spitting in his mouth and him noting a young woman’s reaction, he was there and with us. Hell, just for fun, I think, he walked into the audience and being that this wasn’t an eventual Netflix special, people were more than allowed to take pictures. He even posed a few times, throughout the set, and held them a little so if you had your phone out already, you got a good shot. [note]My phone’s camera is a feature I use as much as the whole calling feature so forgive my amateur shots. But, at the same time, I’m not the type to watch things live and want to see them through a small screen.[/note]

He Talked About Things a Lot Of Black Comedians Don’t Really

Black comedy, right now, is dominated by men. Straight, masculine conforming, arguably a little homophobic, men. So to see a Black gay man do comedy brings something different. Especially one who isn’t up there in age, married with kids, and pretty much that is his focus. To me, Kid Fury sort of bridges the political commentary of Chris Rock mixed with the storytelling of Dave Chappelle. Which isn’t necessarily trying to imply he is their gay comedy baby, but more so it seems like those are his inspirations and the way he tells jokes seems similar.

But, again, topic wise is where he stands out for he isn’t talking about pop culture as if it is something completely foreign to him. He, perhaps like Kathy Griffin in a way, has done his homework. Not enough to write a dissertation, but enough to know what the hell he is talking about. Making it where when he talks about Tummy Tea, McDonald’s commercials, Future’s issues with drugs, and what not, while there is a joke there, you can also see some underlying depth.

Take for instance the tummy tea thing. He notes it is a lie, what many a Kardashian sells, but reminds the audience that his grandma [note]Who is from the Caribbean[/note] had teas for everything. You name the ailment, she got a tea for you. Yet, where is her empire? Where is the Caribbean, or African, brand that has all the teas which can cure the common cold, allergies, depression, and stupidity?

On The Fence

What Kid Fury Planned For vs. What Was Advertised

Kid Fury’s set, including Asante’s appearance, was about 1 hour and 15 minutes. Now, looking at the ticket, 7 PM is when they open the doors, [note]They did not do that on the dot[/note] 8 PM when the show was supposed to start, and 10 PM is when things are advertised to be over. With that, you can understand why, after a little more than an hour, and he is talking about being done, people were like, “What?” Especially since, so it seems, many are used to him and Crissle on “The Read” and them going two hours and beyond. But, considering he was good from start to finish, I wasn’t mad. I spent more money on performances like Fade [note]I think[/note] and was left with not even 1/100 of the satisfaction I got out of this show.

Overall: Positive (See Live) – Recommended

I do believe the show was filmed, so between putting it on YouTube, like his last Furious Thoughts Tour, to maybe making it merchandise, you’ll hopefully be able to get to see this. However, there is something about seeing this dude dance out onto the stage, and just his energy which makes it so, I feel, you won’t get the full bang for your buck watching a video. You got to see the audience member who he is interacting with, see all these people, from the back to front, lifting the bottles they brought in, and see the people he is playing off of. For while we weren’t on stage, he was definitely playing off his audience.

But what really makes me believe you need to see him live isn’t his antics, or his audience’s, but because he is different. Now, are there perhaps other Black men, much less gay men, who talk about the same things? Maybe. However, they, unfortunately, aren’t at the stage Kid Fury is and so he is the one basically opening the doors for them. So while the young man is no Richard Pryor, he still deserves his pedestal for bringing something that, mainstream wise, we don’t see hardly at all.

How Would You Rate This?

Negative Mixed Positive

About Amari Sali 3103 Articles
New Jersey native Amari Sali takes the approach of more so being a media advisor than a critic to sort of fill in the gap left between casual fans of media and those who review productions for a living. Thus being open about bias while still giving enough insight, often with spoilers, to present whether something is worth seeing, buying, renting, streaming, or checking out at all.

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