Preacher: Season 1/ Episode 1 "Pilot" [Series Premiere] – Overview/ Review (with Spoilers)

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Overview

There is a new anti-hero on the block and he is a reformed preacher with a badass ex-girlfriend, an otherworldly new friend, and a promise he is trying to keep. That is, if between small town folk and assassins he survives.

Rating:
Stick Around

Trigger Warning(s):
Blood (gore) & Exposed Bones

Characters Worth Noting

Jesse Custer (Dominic Cooper) | Cassidy (Joseph Gilgun) | Tulip (Ruth Negga)

Main Storyline (with Commentary)

When Jesse was just a boy he saw his father die right in front of him. His father was a good man, a local pastor, and he wanted his son to follow in his footsteps. Well, while a promise was made Jesse eventually found himself in love with a woman like Tulip. A good girl if you go by first impressions, but get to know her and you’ll learn she is a bad ass, as well as psychotic. However, even after Jesse remembers his promise to his dad and returns home to Annville, Texas, leaving Tulip in the dust, she just can’t get over him. So, with nostalgia in her heart, and a map in her pocket which may lead to riches, she finds her old lover and seems ready to coerce him into helping her.

Though she may need some luck with that. For while Jesse maybe masquerading as a local pastor, one weak, indifferent, and just weakly trying to fulfill a promise, change is coming. The first bit comes from a man named Cassidy coming in, after brutalizing multiple men trying to kill him on a plane, and him crash landing in Annville. Then comes the men who have taken an interest in Cassidy, if not are coming to this small town to find Tulip or Jesse. Either way, for those who always want some Quentin Tarintino styled violence, with less monologues, some fantasy elements, and around the same amount of action, you got yourself a show.

Review Summary

Highlights                    

A  part of me feels like if you kept the action that usually goes on in Quentin Tarintino movies, but cut the lavish dialog and slightly too long for its own good plot, you may get something like Preacher. Granted, I could never see Tarintino make something like this, because the character are just, meh, but action wise this fits the body description.

On The Fence

My sole reason for checking this out was Ruth Negga. For while Seth Rogen and his BFF for life are producing, it feels like years since I saw something with Negga in it. So, with that said, my love for her continues since she presents just the right amount of sarcasm and bad ass moves. However, I must note that when I put my fanboy hat away, Negga’s Tulip benefits strongly from the lack of diverse roles for women of color. Because she is an anomaly she is special.

While Jesse and Cassidy both are presented as slightly weird beings, especially since Cassidy can whoop ass, survive jumping out of a plane 30,000 feet, and is basically an Irish Sam Rockwell, I must admit they seem like they can get boring with time. Cooper as Jesse presents your usual anti-hero who, because of guilt due to a broken promise, is driven to do something. However, unlike many who usually do so with spirit, the Jesse we are introduced to is indifferent about life. So indifferent that honestly, it becomes easy to become bored of him. Then, when it comes to Cassidy, whether you decide to see him as comic relief or a possible jump starter to counteract Jesse, there comes this feeling that his shtick can and will get old. How quickly? Well, it is hard to say. However, I don’t feel like either of these two men give you a reason to latch onto this show and make sure you catch it first airing. As for me, I’ll stick around, but probably wait till it comes on demand the following day or sometime before it is no longer offered online.

No ratings yet.

What's Your Take?

Author: Amari Sali

New Jersey native Amari Sali takes the approach of more so being a media advisor than a critic to sort of fill in the gap left between casual fans of media and those who review productions for a living. Thus being open about bias while still giving enough insight, often with spoilers, to present whether something is worth seeing, buying, renting, streaming, or checking out at all. An avid writer, Amari hopes to eventually switch from talking about other people's productions to fully working on his own. Such a dream is in progress to becoming reality.

Questions, Comments, or Opposing Opinion?